September 2017 Reading Recap

I blinked and September was over!  What are your highlights and lowlights from September?  You’ll notice I read a bunch of short stories this month — I just got on a roll!  Do you recommend any short story collections?  

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The Rosie Project (Don Tillman #1) by Graeme Simsion

9781922079770PUBLISHER: Penguin
RELEASE DATE: 
April 11, 2013
GENRE: 
Adult Fiction, Rom Com
PAGE COUNT:
 297
MY RATING: ★★★☆
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Blurb in one sentence: A genetics professor with undiagnosed Asperger Syndrome embarks on the “Wife Project”, only to fall inconveniently in love with a woman with whom he is completely incompatible.

What I Liked:

  • Rosie is not a manic pixie dream girl.  Presenting a self-assured attitude to the world, she is autonomous and intelligently rationalises her decisions and behaviour.
  • I saw on Goodreads that lots of reviewers criticised The Rosie Project for representing Asperger Syndrome in a feel-good, comedic context.  I don’t believe that The Rosie Project romanticised Asperger Syndrome or treated it flippantly.  In fact, I think this story illuminated its unique challenges and positive aspects, with an appropiate mixture of seriousness and comedy.

What I Disliked:

  • So many people want to argue with me about this book, and I honestly can’t be bothered!
  • The plot is pretty flimsy, but, considering the tropes of the rom-com genre, this didn’t get in the way of me enjoying the journey.

If you like The Rosie Project, you may enjoy:

Fangirl by Rainbow Rowell ★★★★☆ My Review Add on Goodreads
Sofia Khan is Not Obliged by Ayisha Malik ★★★☆☆ My ReviewAdd on Goodreads

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Prince’s Gambit (Captive Prince #2) by C.S. Pacat

5186BVEQOIL._SX331_BO1,204,203,200_PUBLISHER: Viking
RELEASE DATE: 
July 1, 2015
GENRE: 
High Fantasy
PAGE COUNT:
 404
MY RATING: ★★★
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Blurb in one sentence: The tensions (political and sexual) between enemy nations come to a head as Prince Laurent of Vere marches a ragtag army into his treacherous uncle’s ambush.

What I Liked:

  • The sexual tension was palpable.  Building on the slow boil of the first book, Prince’s Gambit is such a guilty pleasure.
  • I waited so long for the sex scene and it did not disappoint.

What I Disliked:

  • The romance was the only aspect that held my attention, so I started to lose interest whenever the focus was on the political tensions.  Without the romance plot, I don’t believe the rest of the world- and plot-building are strong enough to stand alone.  I bumped down my rating from four to three stars because the more I reflect on the story, the less convincing I find it.  (That said, nothing got in the way of my enjoyment while reading — all the sexiness blinded me from noticing the flaws!)

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The Shining (The Shining #1) by Stephen King

11588PUBLISHER: Hodder & Stoughton
RELEASE DATE: 
July 1, 1980
GENRE: 
High Fantasy
PAGE COUNT:
 447
MY RATING: ★★★
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Blurb in one sentence: While Jack Torrance is grateful for a fresh start as winter caretaker of a prestigious hotel, his five-year-old son Danny’s powers of clairvoyance unlocks the Overlook’s repressed evil.

What I Liked:

  • I was pleasantly surprised by this introduction to Stephen King.  I never thought I would read — let alone love — his books.  Throughout, I was captivated and transported by the depth of the descriptive details.
  • The scenes told from Danny’s point of view were easily my favourite.  They tapped into my memories of childhood nightmares etc. and nailed exactly how fear feels when you’re a kid.

What I Disliked:

  • The scenes told from Dick Holloran’s point of view slowed me down a lot.  I know their function is to build the sense of foreboding and suspense, but I just couldn’t engage with them.
  • Is it possible that the ending is too tame?  I must be awfully bloodthirsty!  (I had no expectations because I haven’t seen the movie.)

If you like The Shining, you may enjoy:

Hex by Thomas Olde Heuvelt★★★★☆ My ReviewAdd on Goodreads

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Madam Zero by Sarah Hall

madame-zero-by-sarah-halPUBLISHER: Faber & Faber
RELEASE DATE: 
July 6, 2017
GENRE: 
Short Fiction
PAGE COUNT:
 192
MY RATING: ★★★★
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Blurb in one sentence: Sarah Hall’s short story collection blurs human and animal, wilderness with man-made, to take readers on a memorable trip through the jungle that is human nature.

What I Liked:

  • After reading this collection, the individual stories stayed alive in my mind for days.  I could put the book away, but I couldn’t avoid replaying stand-out moments over and over in my head.
  • Reading this collection has motivated me to look into Sarah Hall’s novels.

What I Disliked:

  • It was too short!  I want more stories!

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Paper Girls Vol. 3 by Brian K. Vaughn & Cliff Chiang

34504722PUBLISHER: Image Comics
RELEASE DATE: 
August 8, 2017
GENRE: 
Young Adult Graphic Novel
PAGE COUNT:
 128
MY RATING: ★★★
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Blurb in one sentence: Four newspaper delivery girls from 1988 get mixed up in some time travel trouble.

What I Liked:

  • This is my favourite installation of the series so far.  As always, the gorgeous colouring alone is a good enough reason to check out this series.

What I Disliked:

  • While the hype that Paper Girls is the “feminist Stranger Things” sounds awesome, let’s face it — just because something has girls in it doesn’t make it feminist.  (Who else is thinking all-female Ghostbusters?)
  • I seriously struggle to tell Erin and Tiffany apart, whereas the character designs of Mac and KJ are distinctly unique.  I’ve struggled with this throughout the series.
  • This is my first time reading a comic series while it’s still being released, and I appreciate how suspenseful the wait between issues is.  I feel like I need a “previously on Paper Girls…” montage to help catch me up to speed.

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Me Talk Pretty One Day by David Sedaris

9780349113913PUBLISHER: Little, Brown & Company
RELEASE DATE: 
June 1, 2000
GENRE:
Short Memoir
PAGE COUNT:
 272
MY RATING: ★★★★
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Blurb in one sentence: Misanthropic humorist, David Sedaris, draws inspiration for his anecdotes from his headache-inducing family and his move from New York to Paris.

What I Liked:

  • As always, I enjoyed Sedaris’ ironic perspective and style of writing.  It just tickles me.  Too good not to share i.e. wake my partner up in the middle of the night to read him my favourite quotes.

What I Disliked:

  • This isn’t my favourite of Sedaris’ memoir collections, but there isn’t anything I dislike about it.

If you like Me Talk Pretty One Day, you may enjoy:

Theft by Finding: Diaries 1977-2002 by David Sedaris ★★★★★| Add on Goodreads

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The Incest Diary by Anonymous

9781408890455PUBLISHER: Bloomsbury
RELEASE DATE: 
July 18, 2017
GENRE:
Memoir, Autobiography
PAGE COUNT:
 128
MY RATING: ★★★★
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Blurb in one sentence: An anonymous survivor tells her story of a childhood and adolescence desecrated by incestual rape to which her family turned a blind eye.

Trigger warning: frequent graphic depictions of domestic violence and sexual abuse.

What I Liked:

  • This short memoir is an Own Voices account of sexual abuse.  It’s vital that you read with discretion as it contains many graphically horrific scenes.  However, I believe that the way it describes the emotional blackmail inherent in the abusive cycle is important, especially for readers who struggle to empathise with abuse survivors due to not understanding what is happening on a psychological level.
  • The nonlinear structure drifts between past and present, touching upon memories that build a strong sense of how the author became the woman she is today.

If you like The Incest Diary, you may enjoy:

The Camera My Mother Gave Me by Susanna Kaysen ★★★★★ My ReviewAdd on Goodreads

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What We Talk About When We Talk About Love by Raymond Carver

4bad9f60-d7fa-0133-77ba-0e7c926a42afPUBLISHER: Vintage Classics
RELEASE DATE:
1981 
GENRE:
Short Fiction
PAGE COUNT:
 134
MY RATING: ★★★★
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Blurb in one sentence: In this short story collection, Raymond Carver reveals the extraordinary in the mundane.

What I Liked:

  • The characters in these stories talk exactly like real people, with such natural idiosyncrasies.  I didn’t realise how fake some dialogue in fiction sounds until I read this collection.
  • The situations in these stories may be unextraordinary, but the snapshots of humanity they capture stayed in my mind long after reading.  Being self-contained but open-ended, they really stirred my imagination.  I immediately placed another Raymond Carver collection on hold through my library because I want to keep savouring his stories.

If you like What We Talk About When We Talk About Love you may enjoy:

This Is How You Lose Her by Junot Díaz ★★★☆☆ | Add on Goodreads

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for colored girls who have considered suicide/when the rainbow is enuf by Ntozake Shange

cvr9781451624205_9781451624205_hrPUBLISHER: Scribner
RELEASE DATE:
1975
GENRE:
Poetry, Stage Play
PAGE COUNT:
 64
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Blurb in one sentence: Acclaimed African-American playwright and performance artist, Ntozake Shange, delivers a powerful message revolving around race and gender discrimination in this “choreopoem”.

Trigger warning: contains references to domestic violence, suicide, and abortion.

What I Liked:

  • As the title suggests, this is an Own Voices work directed at a specific community, speaking to specific experiences and struggles.  The aim is to uplift these silenced voices and reclaim their humanity and equality.  Own Voices narratives like this are so important to read, learn from with humility, and uplift.
  • I haven’t read much poetry since uni, so the rhythm and flow of this “choreopoem” was strange to read (in the best possible way!)

cup-on-books

 

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Graphic Novel Review | Hidden by Mirranda Burton

hidden-by-mirranda-burton-book-review-paiges-pagesTITLE: Hidden
AUTHOR & ARTIST: Mirranda Burton
PUBLISHER: Black Pepper Publishing
RELEASE DATE: 2011
GENRE: Adult Graphic Novel, Short Memoir
PAGE COUNT: 96


Hidden is a powerful introduction to disability narratives.  As the first book I’ve read representing adult intellectual disability, it lays the foundation for me to engage with the topic with better understanding and compassion.  Importantly, it opened my eyes to the key issues surrounding adult intellectual disability. Continue reading

Book Review | Springtime: A Ghost Story by Michelle de Kretser

Springtime a Ghost Story Paige's PagesTITLE: Springtime: A Ghost Story
AUTHOR: Michelle de Kretser
PUBLISHER: Allen & Unwin
RELEASE DATE: October 22, 2014
GENRE: Short Fiction, Adult Fiction
PAGE COUNT: 92


Despite its name, Springtime: A Ghost Story is not actually a ghost story.  This book thoughtfully explores a young Australian woman’s “ghosts” to show how the past is not easily left behind when trying to forge a new future.   

Frances and her partner, Charlie, have chips on their shoulders.  They both want a life separate from the ways of their parents, but now share many of their parents’ idiosyncrasies.  When Frances spies a ghostly woman in her neighbour’s garden, it puts her relationships and past into a new perspective. Continue reading