August Blogging Hiatus

Hi lovely people, how are you?  Whether you’re at work, uni, or enjoying a day off like me, I hope you’re having a fantastic Friday.  I’ve decided to take August off from blogging and go on my first hiatus!  There are two main reasons why I feel this is the right time to take a break:

1.

I’ve been posting to my blog once a week since 2011 and never gone on hiatus!  Of course, over the years a lot has changed about why I blog and what I want from life.  Yet I haven’t stopped to consider how my blog should change to reflect my personal changes.  Sometimes I feel like I blog out of a sense of obligation and perfectionism, without really enjoying it anymore.  So I would like to think about ways I could do things differently to bring some fun back into it.

2.

Entries to the State Library of Queensland Young Writers Award close at the end of August and I’d like to dedicate some time to writing a short story to submit.  It’s been a while since I’ve thought about creative writing besides the novel I’m planning, so putting that project on the back burner for a month will give me a chance to pursue a short-term idea!

If you’re reading this, thank you for being supportive of my blog and for sharing your love of books with me.  At this stage, I hope to be back in the second week of September, when my family and I return from a few days’ holiday to Hamilton Island.  I hope you have a great month. ❤  

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Double Review | More Happy Than Not / History is All You Left Me by Adam Silvera

More Happy Than Not (2015) and History Is All You Left Me (2017) by gay YA author, Adam Silvera, are a perfect pair.  Featuring realistic gay protagonists, they confront themes crucial to older YA readers including identity, sexuality, love, and loss.  Silvera’s representation of mental illness is unflinchingly honest and raw.  I may not be able to bid you “happy reading”, but I hope you will find Silvera’s writing as powerful as I did.

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My 3 Favourite Mothers in Literature | Mother’s Day 2016

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It’s time to celebrate the wonderful women who raised us.  Take a break from brainstorming ways to show your mum some love, and remember your favourite fictional mothers.  Here are my 3 favourite mothers from childhood books:

Miss Honey | Matilda

Miss Honey is Matilda’s school teacher and eventual adoptive mother.  When Matilda’s biological family punishes her for being unique, Miss Honey embraces Matilda’s individuality.  She does everything in her power to nurture Matilda’s special talents and make her feel loved.  Her overflowing joy spreads positivity to her students.

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Molly Weasley | Harry Potter series

Molly Weasley is fiercely protective.  She confronts danger head-on to keep her family safe.  Despite being a tough cookie, Mrs Weasley can also be tender.  Her knitted Christmas sweaters and home cooked meals keep her loved ones warm and cosy all year round.  When Harry visits, she makes him feel like part of the family.

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Marilla Cuthbert | Anne of Green Gables

Marilla Cuthbert may not have signed up for motherhood, but she steps up to the plate when Anne Shirley comes to live at Green Gables.  At first, Marilla is stone cold and strict.  But as Anne warms her heart, she is surprised to experience love like she has never known before.  Sharing in Anne’s misadventures becomes the most rewarding part of her life.

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I hope this list gave you the warm and fuzzies.  Who are your favourite mothers in literature?  Have a wonderful Mother’s Day!

Photo credits: http://www.tumblr.com / http://www.wordpress.com / http://www.anneofgreengables.com

Reading Lemony Snicket Will Hurt Your Head!

Lemony Snicket has a wickedly clever imagination.  A Series of Unfortunate Events is scattered with these trippy tangents.  This one is from Book 13, The End.  Hopefully after reading, you’ll no longer be in the dark about why he’s one of my all-time favourite people.  

The phrase “in the dark,” as I’m sure you know, can refer not only to one’s shadowy surroundings, but also to the shadowy secrets of which one might be unaware.  Every day, the sun goes down over all these secrets, and so everyone is in the dark in one way or another.  If you are sunbathing in a park, for instance, but you do not know that a locked cabinet is buried fifty feet beneath your blanket, then you are in the dark even though you are not actually in the dark, whereas if you are on a midnight hike, knowing full well that several ballerinas are following close behind you, then you are not in the dark even if you are in fact in the dark.  Of course, it is quite possible to be in the dark in the dark, as well as to be not in the dark not in the dark, but there are so many secrets in the world that it is likely that you are always in the dark about one thing or another, whether you are in the dark in the dark or in the dark not in the dark, although the sun can go down so quickly that you may be in the dark about being in the dark in the dark, only to look around and find yourself no longer in the dark in the dark about being in the dark in the dark, but in the dark in the dark nonetheless, not only because of the dark, but because of the ballerinas in the dark, who are not in the dark about the dark, but also not in the dark about the locked cabinet, and you may be in the dark about the ballerinas digging up the locked cabinet in the dark, even though you are no longer in the dark about being in the dark, and so you are in fact in the dark about being in the dark, even though you are not in the dark about being in the dark, and so you fall into the hole that the ballerinas have dug, which is dark, in the dark, and in the park – page 191

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