Graphic Novel Review | El Deafo by Cece Bell

El Deafo Book Review Paige's PagesTITLE: El Deafo
AUTHOR
: Cece Bell
PUBLISHER
: Harry N. Abrams
RELEASE DATE
: September 2, 2014
GENRE
: Junior Graphic Novel, Memoir
PAGE COUNT
: 233


El Deafo is an utterly adorable Own Voices  graphic novel based on author Cece Bell’s own childhood experience of severe deafness.  One of the many wonderful things about this book is how it avoids representing deafness as a disability.  Although Cece faces plenty of adversity in the form of loneliness, being misunderstood, and toxic friends, she ultimately uses her Phonic Ear hearing aid as a superpower to become the hero, El Deafo.  This is a universally relatable and informative story for junior and middle grade readers that inspires compassion and respect for differently-abled people. Continue reading

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Book Review | Not If I See You First by Eric Lindstrom

Not If I See You First Book Review Paige's Pages.pngTITLE: Not If I See You First
AUTHOR
: Eric Lindstrom
PUBLISHER
: HarperCollins Children’s
RELEASE DATE
: December 1, 2015
GENRE
: Young Adult Fiction
PAGE COUNT
: 310


At the heart of Not If I See You First is a powerful message about disability, disbanding blindness stereotypes I didn’t even realise I believed.  While I loved this representation, our fierce front woman, Parker Grant, is not the best developed character.  Despite having some fantastic themes with plenty of potential, this book was hit and miss for me. Continue reading

Book Review | A Time to Dance by Padma Venkatraman

A Time to Dance Review Paige's PagesTITLE: A Time to Dance
AUTHOR
: Padma Venkatraman
PUBLISHER
: Nancy Paulsen Books
RELEASE DATE
: May 1, 2014
GENRE
: Young Adult Fiction
PAGE COUNT
: 320


A Time to Dance is unlike any other book I’ve read.  Delivered in flowing verse, Venkatraman combines a lovingly detailed representation of disability with sumptuous insights to her own culture and religion.  The result is a story for all ages that celebrates the beauty in all things.  Its uplifting message has resonated with me long after reading, and impacted my perspectives on disability and religion.   Continue reading

Book Review | Paperboy by Vince Vawter

paperboy-review-paiges-pagesTITLE: Paperboy
AUTHOR: Vince Vawter
PUBLISHER: Delacorte Books for Young Readers
RELEASE DATE: May 14, 2013
GENRE: Junior Fiction
PAGE COUNT: 240


Set in ’50s suburban Memphis, Paperboy is a gripping Own Voices coming-of-age story.  11-year-old Little Man has battled with a debilitating stutter all his life.  His unique view of the world takes us on an adventure beyond the walls people raise to defend their inner truths.  Paperboy is about not judging a book by its cover.  

Little Man is our irresistible first person narrator.  When his best friend goes away for a month, Little Man offers to cover his newspaper delivery route.  This seemingly trivial favour is a terrifying challenge.  When he musters the courage to speak to strangers, he discovers much more to his neighbourhood than meets the eye.  Continue reading

Graphic Novel Review | Hidden by Mirranda Burton

hidden-by-mirranda-burton-book-review-paiges-pagesTITLE: Hidden
AUTHOR & ARTIST: Mirranda Burton
PUBLISHER: Black Pepper Publishing
RELEASE DATE: 2011
GENRE: Adult Graphic Novel, Short Memoir
PAGE COUNT: 96


Hidden is a powerful introduction to disability narratives.  As the first book I’ve read representing adult intellectual disability, it lays the foundation for me to engage with the topic with better understanding and compassion.  Importantly, it opened my eyes to the key issues surrounding adult intellectual disability. Continue reading

Book Review | Barracuda by Christos Tsiolkas

Barracuda Review Paige's PagesTITLE: Barracuda
AUTHOR: Christos Tsiolkas
PUBLISHER: Allen & Unwin
RELEASE DATE: November 1, 2013
GENRE: Adult Fiction, LGBTQI+
PAGE COUNT: 516


Undressing cultural taboos, Barracuda is a crucial book for everyday Australians.  Now with a brand new ABC mini-series, I can’t wait for it to rise to the same fame as author Christos Tsiolkas’ controversial novel, The Slap. 

14-year-old Danny is at home in the water.  He is obsessed with being the best swimme at his school and making it to the 2000 Sydney Olympics.  Failure is unthinkable. Continue reading